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New York City from Bus Window (Wayne Ferrebee, 2015, color pencil and ink)

New York City from Bus Window (Wayne Ferrebee, 2015, color pencil and ink)

This weekend I took a trip up to Kingston, an old colonial town up the Hudson River.  I was visiting to see a friend’s art gallery, One Mile Gallery, (which you should check out when you are in the region–but more on that in later posts).  I took the bus a hundred miles up the river and jumped out, prepared to walk through a few blocks of quaint historical district–but the actual walk was more like a five mile hike through fields and ravines, past old stockades and cement factories (and strip malls).  Additionally I unknowingly visited on the day when the townsfolk reenacted the 1777 burning of their town by King George’s redcoats!  The whole trip had a very spooky autumn feel and I highly recommend Kingston (although if you visit you should maybe plan better than me and not run through the forests at night as the first snows arrive).

Hudson Valley from Bus Window (Wayne Ferrebee, 2015, color pencil and ink)

Hudson Valley from Bus Window (Wayne Ferrebee, 2015, color pencil and ink)

Anyway here are four drawings I made on the trip.  The first two were on the busride on the way up.  There is New York City seen rising like a twisted lovely dream above the marshes and suburbs of New Jersey.  Next we see the bucolic Hudson landscape blurring from the bus window.

Kingston (Wayne Ferrebee, 2015, color pencil on paper)

Kingston (Wayne Ferrebee, 2015, color pencil on paper)

This is a drawing of the historic cemetery at Kingston.  I took certain liberties since I was rushing through and I drew in the details on the bus.  The green statue guy is George Clinton, the fourth Vice-President of the United States.  Finally on the bus ride home, I became enthralled by the same picturesque Hudson Valley clouds that have beguiled so many artists over the years.  Hopefully you enjoyed the sketches from my little autumn mini-trip.  I’ll get back to real posts tomorrow and we’ll start leading up to next week’s Halloween themed week of horror and dread!

Hudson Valley Sky in Autumn (Wayne Ferrebee, 2015, color pencil and ink)

Hudson Valley Sky in Autumn (Wayne Ferrebee, 2015, color pencil and ink)

The Mohonk Mountain House looms over Mohonk Lake

The Mohonk Mountain House looms over Mohonk Lake


The Mohonk Mountain House is a monstrous Victorian castle built between 1879 and 1910 on Lake Mohonk in upstate New York. I was there this weekend to attend my friends’ wedding in the sprawling gardens, and I was forcefully struck by the Ghormenghast grandeur of the house and properties which are simultaneously beautiful and cheerful yet exude a haunting wistfulness.
Mohonk Mountain House Gardens

Mohonk Mountain House Gardens


Located just beyond the southern boundary of the Catskills, the hotel features multiple ornate turrets and towers festooned with finials and oddly shaped weather vanes (squids maybe?). The inside is a baffling labyrinth of hallways, sitting rooms, libraries, and porches. Outside, numerous rustic gazebos and folly buildings are spread through gorgeous gardens and vertiginous meadow rambles. Beyond the hotel, lovely forests stretch up into the mountains or down into the spooky wooded fens which feed the mighty Hudson.
A fen (or carr, or tarn, or bog?) by New Paltz, New York

A fen (or carr, or tarn, or bog?) by New Paltz, New York

Speaking of spooky, the hotel and the surrounding hills have amassed all sorts of reports concerning specters of varying temperaments and classes, from giggling children, to poltergeists, to wispy flames, to lurking drown victims, to dark toothy shadows in the hedge maze: the Mohonk seems to have every sort of ghost story.

Mohonk Mountain House (photo by cindy from rPhotosOnline.com)

Mohonk Mountain House (photo by cindy from rPhotosOnline.com)

It is said that a young, poor Stephen King visited the house and that shadows of the building linger in The Shining, The Regulators, and The Talisman. The Mohonk was also used as the set for the Victorian Sanitarium in the movie The Road to Wellville.
Marbletown-20130831-00305
Apparently there were once a great many lumbering Victorian edifices like the Mohonk spread through America, but almost all of them have now burnt down. The Smiley brothers, who constructed the building, were early advocates of safety and environmental awareness, so their huge flammable heap was equipped with all sorts of sprinklers and fire hoses. We should probably feel that the big burned-up spots where the other hotels used to be are haunted and celebrate the lovely Mohonk as the safest and least disaster-prone resort of its era.

Hooray for Safety!

Hooray for Safety!

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