the-rlv-td-is-relatively-tiny-its-21-foot-length-makes-it-much-much-smaller-than-nasas-retired-fleet-of-122-foot-long-100-ton-space-shuttles

Once people have done something for the first time, it becomes much easier to do it again and again in novel ways.  I mention this, because, just this week, the great nation of India tested their own scaled-down and scaled-back prototype version of a space shuttle.  ISRO (The India Space Research Organization) fired a 7m-scale model lander about 70km (43 miles) into the atmosphere from a spaceport in took off from Andhra Pradesh.  The craft was launched atop a HS9 solid rocket booster. It is unclear whether the organization has recovered the prototype or not.

indian-space-research-organization-scientists-think-the-shuttle-could-cut-costs-by-as-much-as-10-times--bringing-the-total-down-to-2000-per-kilogram

The Indian spaceplane program is proceeding on a tiny budget which would make NASA (or even SpaceX) wince. The little prototype cost the equivalent of $14 million dollars. However the Indian government has big plans: within 15 years they hope to build a full scale Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV-TD) capable of repeatedly going into orbit and then returning through Earth’s atmosphere to land safely.  Since NASA has been working on projects very different from spaceplanes, I am glad to see that somebody else is still working on the concept.  I will be extremely curious to watch the progress of this Indian offspring of the original shuttle program which was such a triumphant and tragic centerpiece of space exploration during my childhood.

it-lifted-off-and-cruised-to-35-miles-above-the-earth-then-detached-from-the-rocket-and-reached-its-highest-altitude-of-about-40-miles