Dried Kombu

Dried Kombu

Kombu (Laminaria japonica) is a sort of edible brown algae.  This kelp grows from 2 to 5 meters long (6 to 15 feet) but in perfect conditions it can grow to be 10 meters (30 feet) in length.  Kombu is native to the coasts of Japan and it has been eaten there since the Jōmon era (a prehistoric era when Japan was inhabited by hunter-gatherers). The seaweed is famous for its rich umami flavor and it is nutritionally valuable as a source of protein, fat, fiber, and minerals.

Underwater Kombu bed (on a synthetic reef in Korea)

Underwater Kombu bed (on a synthetic reef in Korea)

During the 1920s, Kombu was exported to China where it is known as Haidai—it is particularly popular in northern China (where green vegetables are scarce in winter).  The seaweed has also been traded extensively to Korea.

Kombu (Haidai) being cultivated along the Chinese coast

Kombu (Haidai) being cultivated along the Chinese coast

Kombu was originally harvested wild from cold rich coastal ocean waters where it attaches to sub-littoral rocks but the 2 year growing season was frustrating to consumers. Today Kombu is grown in immense industrial scale on aquaculture plantations around China, Korea, and Japan. Brown algae cultivation involves sophisticated manipulation of alternation of generations (the metagenetic reproductive cycle of plants).

Converse All Star Suede shoes in “Kombu Green”

Converse All Star Suede shoes in “Kombu Green”

There is a dark chartreuse (yellow-green) color, Kombu green which takes its name from the beloved kelp.